The Laboratory of Computational Biology

Richard Pastor, Bernard Brooks and Mehdi Pirooznia

The Laboratory of Computational Biology is an interdisciplinary group of scientists who study biological processes via computer simulation. It is part of the Biochemistry and Biophysics Center Division of Intramural Research National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in the National Institutes of Health. The laboratory is a consortium of the laboratories lead by Dr. Bernard R. Brooks and Dr. Richard Pastor.

Groups

The Laboratory is consortium of two Labs and one section in one facility. Each laboratory is led by a principal investigator. A brief overview of their work is given here, and you can find out more in the web pages for each Lab.


Laboratory of Computational Biophysics

Dr. Bernard Brooks

The Laboratory of Computational Biophysics consists of researchers who both develop simulation and modeling techniques and apply them towards the study of problems of biological significance. Techniques employed include; molecular dynamics, quantum and molecular mechanics, ab initio analysis of small molecule structures, molecular modeling, and electron microscopy image analysis.


Laboratory of Membrane Biophysics

Dr. Richard Pastor

The Laboratory of Membrane Biophysics is a group of researchers who use diverse theoretical methods combined with high performance computing to investigate the properties of lipid membranes and related molecular assemblies. The Lab operates under the direction of Dr. Richard Pastor; the group joined the NIH/NHLBI Laboratory of Computational Biology (LCB) in 2006, after 20 years in FDA/CBER's Laboratory of Biophysics.


Laboratory of Bioinformatics

Dr. Mehdi Pirooznia

The Laboratory of Bioinformatics group utilizes a vast array of techniques and technologies from bioinformatics to statistics to analyze and assimilate next-generation sequencing data and glean information pertinent to the underlying biology. The driving goal of the laboratory is to cultivate a bridge between precision medicine and emerging clinical and biological datasets. The major objectives of the group are the following: 1) Integrative Omics Analysis, 2) Biomedical Data Science, and 3) Developing Biological Knowledgebase.


High Performance Computing Section

John Legato

The High Performance Computing Section (HPCS) maintains and supports all the infrastructure of hardware and software of the LoBoS cluster that allow researchers of the laboratory to use high performance computing to investigate biological processes. The section operates under the direction of John Legato.